Mobility policies

    Turning safely – despite a blind spot

    Driver assistance systems complement a driver's performance in situations where he or she has reached their limits. A turn assist, for example, offers a solution for the blind spot.

    Driver assistance systems complement a driver's performance in situations where he or she has reached their limits. A turn assist, for example, offers a solution for the blind spot.

    Assistance systems are playing an increasingly important role in hazard prevention

    With the implementation within the EU of UN R151 – "Uniform provisions concerning the approval of motor vehicles with regard to the Blind Spot Information System for the Detection of Bicycles" (BSIS for short) – uniform conditions for turning assistance systems that monitor the so-called blind spot must be created for all new models as of 2022, and for all new registrations as of 2024. The scope of application is intended for heavy commercial vehicles and buses, thus complying with the requirements of the General Safety Regulation of Regulation (EU) 2019/2144.

    Assistance systems are playing an increasingly important role in accident prevention, as they provide drivers with meaningful support and point out possible dangerous situations. The German Association of the Automotive Industry (VDA) and its members are convinced of these systems, enough so that even before the legal requirements came into force, support was given to the Federal Ministry for Digital and Transport's "Turn Assist Campaign," which campaigns for the voluntary outfitting of an assistance system of this kind. 

    BSIS: Distinction between information signal and warning

    The BSIS described in UN R151 provides for the distinction between an information signal and a warning when turning right. The former is intended to point out cyclists alongside the vehicle and thus within the potential danger zone when turning – regardless of whether the vehicle even has the intention of turning. An optical signal is intended as an indication for the driver. If a cyclist is detected and the turning process initiated, the system must assess the possibility of a collision. If this is the case, a warning must also be issued. The warning signal can be of an optical, acoustic, or haptic nature, or a combination of these.

    Currently, VDA members are also working on enhancements to the BSIS: One possibility is the additional detection of pedestrians. Another variant should also initiate emergency braking if a pedestrian or cyclist is detected during the turning process and the driver does not react adequately. 

    Philipp Niermann
    Contact person

    Philipp Niermann

    Head of Technical Regulations and Materials, Regulations and Harmonization Division

    Read on